Grants Awarded

Planet Detroit – $20,000

Community Journalism Training for Detroit Residents

This grant will help Planet Detroit launch a community journalism training program. In this program, Planet Detroit will train community reporters to report on sustainability issues in their neighborhoods and communities, such as local food production and security, vacant lot and alley activation, housing rehabilitation and development, and habitat restoration. The stories will highlight human and nature-based solutions while shedding light on the challenges that local leaders and entrepreneurs face in holding leaders accountable and while elevating grassroots community groups as they overcome these challenges. Planet Detroit will partner with El Central Media to translate and republish the stories in Spanish.

Michigan History Foundation – $25,000

Gchi Mshijkenh Deh Minising/Heart of the Great Turtle Island

This grant will support a collaborative effort involving the State of Michigan, four tribes, and local partners in developing and interpreting the west side of Straits State Park in St. Ignace, MI. The project will add Anishinaabe context to the story of Michigan told at the site through a Learning Commons, outdoor trails, and structures at a Powwow Circle. This will make it a key interpretive space for explaining the seasonality of Anishinaabe life in both the pre- and post-contact periods, as well as their culture's continuing relationship with the natural world. Americana's grant will be used to construct a Drum Circle structure at the center of the Powwow Circle.

Headwaters Land Conservancy – $16,000

Landowner Stewardship Resources Assistance

Headwaters will use this grant to launch an educational stewardship-based program to help private landowners in northeastern Michigan improve land management practices. Private land conservation and management will help to create corridors of sustainable habitat to support the growth and preservation of Michigan flora and fauna. Headwaters will offer the program in partnership with local conservation districts, MSU Extension, and local invasive species management groups.

Historic Locust Grove – $25,000

Reducing Barriers to Historic Resources

Historic Locust Grove, an 18th-century farm site and National Historic Landmark near Louisville, Kentucky, will use this grant to install outdoor interpretive signage, accessible to visitors throughout the 55-acre site, to illuminate the stories of the historic people who lived and worked on the property. The signage will present the site's full history, particularly the history of the large and varied enslaved community, so that all visitors -- not just those participating in ticketed tours - know that the full history of the site is honored in the site's interpretation.

Historic Deerfield – $25,000

Unnamed Figures: Black Presence and Absence in the early American North

Unnamed Figures is an exhibition and publication developed by the American Folk Art Museum in New York that explores the often-unacknowledged presence of Black makers and subjects in the visual and material culture of the 18th and early 19th centuries in the North American North. Historic Deerfield, an outdoor history museum in Deerfield, MA, will use this grant to develop programs to deepen public discussion of these themes and to bring the exhibition to Historic Deerfield in Spring 2024 following its origination (and only other showing) at AFAM.

Make Food Not Waste

Make Food Not Waste on College Campuses

Make Food Not Waste will use this grant to create and deliver a behavior change program directed at college students. The purpose of the program is to reduce consumer food waste, which remains the greatest source of food waste in the food system. The program will focus on college campuses because research shows that college students are significant generators of food waste, especially of edible food. Make Food Not Waste will develop and deliver the program in partnership with five local colleges and universities (Oakland University, Lawrence Technological University, College for Creative Studies, Wayne State University, and University of Detroit-Mercy).

Allen Neighborhood Center – $5,000

Hunter Park GardenHouse School Field Trip Pilot Program

This match grant will leverage funds raised from other sources to expand a field trip program that enables schools and youth groups in the Greater Lansing area to deepen their connection to local food systems and learn about nutrition, botany, and other farm and garden educational topics.

Bethany Housing Ministries dba Community Encompass – $5,000

McLaughlin Grows Educational Garden

This match grant will leverage funds raised from other sources to construct a growing space next to an existing community farm in Muskegon. The new space will include no-till farm beds that students from area schools can use to grow and harvest produce that they can take home to their families. Students will engage in hands-on outdoor classes where they will learn to perform soil testing, diagnose plant diseases, identify pests, and learn the best way to grow fresh food.

Michigan Sustainable Business Forum – $25,000

Benton Harbor Justice 40 Initiative: Building Sustainability Capacity

MSBF will use this grant to recruit and retain a sustainability project manager to support the City of Benton Harbor and to work alongside local community-based organizations, regional institutional partners, and state/national benefactors to develop and execute climate justice and sustainability programs and initiatives to capture opportunities created by state and federal Justice 40 grants. The grant will provide the required match for a $74,000 grant awarded by The Funders Network under the Partners for Places Program.

University of Michigan – $20,000

"Hear Me Now:" The Black Potters of Old Edgefield, South Carolina - Programming at the UM Museum of Art

This grant will support educational programming associated with the "Hear Me Now" exhibition at the University of Michigan Museum of Art (UMMA). The programming will be designed in collaboration with exhibition co-curator and UM Professor of History Jason Young and will illuminate and extend the exhibition for regional audiences in Michigan. Programs will include structured programs for K-12 and university students; guided tours led by curators and educators, and gallery talks. UMMA anticipates that 40,000+ visitors will engage with the exhibition and 5,000+ will participate in programming.

Soo Locks Childrens Museum – $25,000

Interactive Tree Exhibits for the Nature-Themed Section

This grant will enable the Soo Locks Children's Museum in Sault Ste. Marie, MI to install an interactive exhibit consisting of floor-to-ceiling interactive trees that will feature nature-based and native traditional information to engage children in learning about seasonal changes, their impact on wildlife, waterfowl, and fish, and the seasonal customs of the Anishinaabe people.

Colonial Williamsburg Foundation – $20,000

"I Made This...." Black Artists and Artisans Conference

Colonial Williamsburg will use this grant to support a conference related to the "I Made This…" exhibition that celebrates Black artistry in the fields of folk, fine and decorative arts. The conference will feature three days of activities, including keynote presentations by historians, lectures by CW's curatorial staff, panel discussions with the historic trades team, guided tours of the exhibition, onsite tours of two additional African American themed archaeological projects underway in CW's historic area, a demonstration of African American foodways, and performances by CW's historical interpretive staff.

Edison Institute – $20,000

Make Food Not Waste

Make Food Not Waste will use this grant to create and deliver a behavior change program directed at college students. The purpose of the program is to reduce consumer food waste, which remains the greatest source of food waste in the food system. The program will focus on college campuses because research shows that college students are significant generators of food waste, especially of edible food. Make Food Not Waste will develop and deliver the program in partnership with five local colleges and universities (Oakland University, Lawrence Technological University, College for Creative Studies, Wayne State University, and University of Detroit-Mercy).

Mackinac Straits Raptor Watch – $9,300

Straits Area Migration Station

This grant will support the purchase of five cellular backpack transmitters (with associated data costs) that researchers at MSU use to track and map the migratory pathways of redtail hawks at the Mackinac Straits.

DPS Foundation – $7,500

DPSCD's Horticulture Program

This grant will provide one year of supplemental salary support for a horticulture teacher at Randolph Career and Technical Center. The Randolph CTE provides high school students with a career pathway education program that includes hands-on learning, job shadowing, project learning, apprenticeships, and certifications in various fields, including horticulture.
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CONTACT US

If you have reviewed our mission, program areas, priorities, and guidelines and still have questions, feel free to contact us or schedule a 30-minute intro meeting with the Executive Director. We will be happy to address any inquiries you may have.

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